Historiometric research is based on the study of historical data and records to make inferences on the subject or topic being studied. Here Cox’s team gathered psychologically relevant data, both from primary and secondary sources, on number of individuals of eminent status. From those historical records the team conducted statistical analysis of the psychological aspects of genius (Cox, 1926, p.17). She points out that this type of scientific study is markedly different from study of topics such as mathematics. She asserts that “It is clear that with the exception of mathematics, the sciences cannot obtain, nor do they require, absolute, but rather relative accuracy” (Cox, 1926, p.27). Detailed data is available for both groups within the literature. Each of the 301 subjects includes a report containing:
1) Name, dates, field, ranking on Cattell’s 1000 List
2) Biography
3) Chronology
4) Ancestry and family
5) Development to age 26
6) Characterization
7) Basis for eminence
For each element, information was carefully gathered and evaluated with care. Cox felt that points 4 and 5 were the most impactful for this study and as such point 5 was meticulously compiled (Cox, 1926, p.39-40).


REFERENCES:
Cox, C. (1926). The early mental traits of three hundred geniuses. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

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Cox, C. (1926). The early mental traits of three hundred geniuses. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
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Cox, C. (1926). The early mental traits of three hundred geniuses. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
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Cox, C. (1926). The early mental traits of three hundred geniuses. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.



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