After reviewing the IQ rating results, it is obvious that there is more to eminence than intelligence. Cox examines environmental influences, the influence of personal interest and character traits as additional factors in the eminence equation.

Environmental Influences
Cox indexed these environmental influences she thought were significant factors in the development of eminent individuals. She arranged three broad categories that were then subdivided and rated on a Likert-like frequency scale.
  1. Current events or movements; travel
  2. Home discipline and breadth of home interests; community and education
  3. Amount of education and reading
Categories 2 and 3 showed the most positive correlation to AII IQs illustrating that ability is dependent upon the environment and to what or which opportunities are grasped. (Cox, 1926, p.165).
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Table 40. p.166 Cox, C. (1926). The early mental traits of three hundred geniuses. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.


Influence of Interests
Cox was also aware that interests of the individuals motivated young geniuses. She identified 3 types generalized interests: intellectual, social and activity interests. Additionally she made approximations based on the breadth of distinct and breadth of related interests were made to determine the extent to which the subject was focused either on related or unrelated interests. She also approximated the intensity of a single interest and the intensity of more than two interests were also evaluated. (Cox, 1926, p.167).
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Table 41. p.168 Cox, C. (1926). The early mental traits of three hundred geniuses. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.


Character Traits
Adapted from Webb’s 1915 study a list of 67 character traits were compiled and rated on a 7-point scale.
Traits 1.JPG
Cox, C. (1926). The early mental traits of three hundred geniuses. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

Traits 2.JPG
Cox, C. (1926). The early mental traits of three hundred geniuses. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

Traits 3.JPG
Cox, C. (1926). The early mental traits of three hundred geniuses. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

Traits 4.JPG
Cox, C. (1926). The early mental traits of three hundred geniuses. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.


REFERENCES:
Cox, C. (1926). The early mental traits of three hundred geniuses. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

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